Western Isles

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Extract from John Thomson’s Atlas of Scotland 1832. Reproduced by permission of the National Library of Scotland

BARRA

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Extract from the 2nd edition OS Map surveyed in 1901, showing Castlebay and an infectious diseases hospital to the north-east. (Reproduced by permission of the National Library of Scotland)

ST BRENDAN’S HOSPITAL, CASTLEBAY  has just 5 beds, and is in a shared building with a local authority care home facility. It is supported by the local GP Practice to provide care of the elderly and other services. The care home opened in 1980, and shares facilities with the hospital.

 

BENBECULA

UIST AND BARRA HOSPITAL  Opened in 2001, replacing the hospitals in Lochmaddy and Daliburgh.  It provides a local service for the population of the Southern Isles. The hospital has 29 beds, and provides care of the elderly, GP Acute and Midwifery led maternity services. Many of the Consultants from the Western Isles Hospital, and some from mainland Health Boards, visit the Uist and Barra Hospital to provide outpatient services. [Source: http://www.wihb.scot.nhs.uk/ospadal-uibhist-agus-bharraigh which includes a photograph of the hospital]

 

LEWIS

COUNTY HOSPITAL, STORNOWAY   Built by the Red Cross during the First World War as the Lewis Sanatorium. It was handed over to the local authority c.1920. It closed in 1992 following the opening of the new Western Isles Hospital.

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The County Hospital was built on a site to the west of Willowglen Cotttage, seen here on the 6-inch OS map, revised in 1960. (Reproduced by permission of the National Library of Scotland)

20 Sani adjusted copyThe former sanatorium photographed in September 1993, reproduced by permission of Kathryn Morrison

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The former sanatorium photographed in September 1993, reproduced by permission of Kathryn Morrison

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The former sanatorium photographed in September 1993, reproduced by permission of Kathryn Morrison

LEWIS HOSPITAL, Goathill Road, Stornoway   The hospital was built by John H. Gall, of Inverness in 1893. (It is labelled Lewis Cottage Hospital (infectious diseases) on the OS map below). The initial plans were for two wards providing accommodation for six patients each with a central administration department which was to contain the matron’s and doctor’s rooms, a central hall and vestibule, two nurse’s duty rooms and, to the rear, the surgery, operating room, kitchen and kitchen offices. A service block with laundry and mortuary were provided for separately. Above the administration area were bedrooms for the staff and one private ward with a bathroom.The hospital closed in 1992 with the opening of the new Western Isles Hospital. [Sources: Lancet, 27 July 1929, p.205: Medical Directory, 1904.]

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2nd Edition OS map revised in 1895. Lewis Cottage Hospital (infectious diseases) is on the top right of the image, along Goathill Road. The Lewis Hospital closed in 1992, together with the County Hospital, when the Western Isles Hospital was opened. (Reproduced by permission of the National Library of Scotland)

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Lewis Hospital photographed in September 1993, reproduced by permission of Kathryn Morrison

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Lewis Hospital photographed in September 1993, reproduced by permission of Kathryn Morrison

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Lewis Hospital, photographed in September 1993, reproduced by permission of Kathryn Morrison

STORNOWAY FEVER HOSPITAL   This small fever hospital for Stornoway provided ten beds. This may be the cottage hospital, given that it was designated as an infectious diseases hospital on the OS Map. 

STORNOWAY POORHOUSE The Lewis Combination Poorhouse was built in 1895 by James M. Thomson of Edinburgh. Later it changed its name to Coulregrain House. [Sources: Scottish Record Office, plans, RHP 30866/1‑19.]

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To the north of Lewis Hospital was the Lewis Combination Poorhouse, towards the centre of this extract from the 2nd edition OS Map surveyed in 1895. (Reproduced by permission of the National Library of Scotland)

For further details of the Lewis poorhouse see workhouses.org

WESTERN ISLES HOSPITAL, STORNOWAY Opened in 1992

 

NORTH UIST

LOCHMADDY HOSPITAL   This hospital was formerly the Long Island Combination Poorhouse, designed by Kinnear and Peddie in 1882-3. In the early 20th century it accepted mentally ill patients, which it was still doing after the 2nd World War when it also provided accommodation for the chronic sick.

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Extract from the 6 inch OS Map revised in 1901. (Reproduced by permission of the National Library of Scotland)

It closed around 2001 after which the buildings lay empty. For further details and photographs of the buildings see workhouses.org

THE HOSPICE, LOCHMADDY   A small maternity unit built on the site of the Long Island Institution c.1938. [Sources: Department of Health for Scotland, 8th Annual Report, 1936, p.90.]

 

SOUTH UIST

County Hospital, Daliburgh

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Extract from the 2nd edition OS Map revised in 1901 (Reproduced by permission of the National Library of Scotland) Bute Hospital was to the east of Daliburgh, and seems to have been the only hospital for miles around at that date. It was built in 1894 and later known as the Sacred Heart Hospital. It only closed in 2000 following the opening of the Uist and Barra Hospital in Benbecula. The old building then became a care home for the elderly – Taigh a’ Chridhe Uile Naomh – for which purpose single-storey extensions were designed by  Robert Fraser, as Principal Architect with Comhairle nan Eilean Siar.

DALIBURGH FEVER HOSPITAL   This small fever hospital provided six beds.

DALIBURGH HOSPITAL   This small hospital opened c.1892. This is probably Bute Hospital – see above.

 

 

 

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